Threatened Species Protection Expansion with assistance from Bill Day of Seaworks

The Aspiring Biodiversity Trust were out in full force on Tuesday and Wednesday (11 & 12 August), determined to increase the protection of our important threatened Taonga species in preparation for the upcomming breeding season. Bill Day of Seaworks kindly offered his assistance of considerable helicopter time; thanks to Lydia Bradey, ABT’s Patron recently awarded a New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM).

A crisp early start at Makarora; Bill Day arrives for the initial health and safety briefing before take off into the backcountry. Left to right: Andy Longman, Lydia Bradey, Bill Day (pilot) & Anthony Coote.

Invasive mammal traps fitted with kea proof fixings were assembled locally then transported to Makarora by vehicle. Here the team (Anthony Coote, Lydia Bradey, Rachel Hufton, Karen Day, Andy Longman) were met by Bill Day (Director of Seaworks keen to contribute to indigenous biodiversity protection) in his B0105 helicopter, equiped with plenty of space for transporting predator traps into the backcountry.

The endangered alpine rock wren (juvenile) or pīwauwau, Crucible Basin.

Traps were droped at a number of locations including the upper Siberia, Crucible Basin,  upper/lower  Lucidus and Wilkin Valley. The locations are of particular importance for remnant populations of the alpine rock wren, the ancient blue duck (whio) and kea (as indentified by ABT surveys and monitoring) and will intensify current predator control regimes.

Trap drop at lower Lucidus – where the habitat of rock wren overlaps with blue duck/ whio territories.

Existing traps identified as triggered from Encounter Solution’s remote monitoring Celium technology were serviced.  The new traps will be fitted with detection nodes extending the alpine remote monitoring network. Stoats are currently active within the alpine environment (where rock wren are likely to be particuarly vulnerable in their current state of torpor durung the winter) and down to the river valley (where blue duck frequent whilst foraging for aquatic invertebrates or grazing from algae clad boulders).

Adult blue duck or whio within the upper Siberia Valley (Credit: Nick Beckwith)

The stoat Mustela erminea is a small mammalian carnivore native to Eurasia and North America. The Wilkin was one of the first New Zealand introduction sites back in 1885’s in an attempt to control rabbits. Usually the fur is chestnut brown with a white underbelly; the tail has a black tip and is the most distinguishing feature of this mustelid. Some stoats undergo a white moult during the winter in alpine New Zealand, the tail tip remains black as shown in the example below from our last trip.

An upper Wilkin alpine stoat (a varacious predator of indigeonous wildlife) displaying its pale coat aiding camouflage during the winter months. Note: animal captured humanely with DOC 200 trap.

Lydia Bradey and Bill Day discussing the importance of the work Aspiring Biodiversity Trust have been doing to date and taking a moment to appreciate their incredible homeland in what was optimal weather conditions. 🙂

Lydia Bradey and Bill Day expressing the importance of indigenous biodiversity protection and restoration (Upper Wilkin Valley), fundamental to New Zealand’s cultural heritage.

Aspiring Biodiversity Trust actively contributing to the goals of Predator Free 2050 and working towards local and national Biodiversity Strategys through collaborative engagement.

Acknowledgements

With thanks to all our funders, volunteers and incredible supporters particuarly Perry Brooks and Rich Raynes for predator trap assembly, the Department Of Conservation (DOC) for validation of landing sites and Backcountry Helicopters for remainder of team pickup on Wednesday.